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Dental Disease

What is periodontal disease?


Periodontal disease is defined as the destruction of tooth attachment (periodontal ligament and jaw bone) caused by bacteria. It begins when bacteria form on teeth in a substance called plaque. If plaque is not removed immediately, two things occur. First, the plaque is calcified by the minerals in saliva to become calculus (or tartar). This is the brown substance on teeth that many people mistakenly equate with periodontal disease, but the truth is that calculus does not result in periodontal disease.

The other thing that occurs with chronic plaque formation is that it will start to move under the gumline. Once the plaque gets under the gum, it starts causing inflammation, which is called gingivitis. Gingivitis is the initial, reversible form of periodontal disease. If this inflammation is not controlled, the bacteria within the gingiva change to a more virulent type. These more virulent species create more severe inflammation. Eventually, the body responds to this inflammation. Part of this response is bony destruction, which continues until the tooth is lost. However, in most cases, periodontal disease causes problems long before this happens.

Is dental disease really a big deal?

Dental disease is a HUGE deal. Periodontal (gum) disease is the number one diagnosed problem in dogs and cats. By the age of just two, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some form of periodontal disease. In addition, 10% of dogs have a broken tooth with pulp (nerve or root canal) exposure. This is extremely painful until the nerve dies, at which point the tooth becomes infected! Infectious oral diseases affecting the gums and root canals create systemic bacteria (bacteria in the bloodstream, which can infect other parts of the body). Periodontal inflammation and infection have been linked to numerous problems, including heart attacks, strokes, kidney disease, emphysema, liver disease, osteoporosis, pregnancy problems and diabetes. Therefore, oral infectious diseases are known as “the silent killer.”

In addition to systemic effects, oral disease can also cause inflammation to the eye, resulting in blindness. Furthermore, jaw bone loss from chronic infection can lead to a jaw fracture known as a pathologic fracture, and these have a very hard time healing. Finally, infectious oral disease can result in osteomyelitis (an area of dead, infected bone), nasal infections and an increased risk of oral cancer. Speaking of oral cancer, the oral cavity is the fourth most common place for cancer. Unfortunately, by the time that most are discovered, they are too advanced for therapy. Early treatment is necessary for a cure. That’s why you, the pet owner, need to check your pet for oral growths regularly. Anything suspicious should be shown to your veterinarian promptly.

In cats, a very common problem is feline tooth resorption lesions caused by normal cells called odontoclasts eating away at the cat’s teeth. Approximately half of the cats over 6 years of age have at least one. They are similar to cavities in that once they are advanced, they are VERY painful and can become infected. They are first seen as small red areas along the gumline.

Other oral problems include bacterial cavities, painful orthodontic problems, dead teeth (commonly discoloured), and worn teeth. Almost every pet has some form of painful or infectious oral disease that needs treatment. Unfortunately, there are few to no obvious clinical signs. Therefore, be proactive and ask your veterinarian for a complete oral exam and perform regular monitoring at home.

Last updated: September 20, 2021.

Dear Clients,

Due to the current changes coming from Alberta Health, we have gone back to a limited capacity policy as of Monday, September 20th, 2021.

This means that we are allowing one client to come in for their pet’s appointment, provided that they are properly masked the entire time when inside of the clinic.

When you arrive for your appointment please call us at 403 982 8387 from the parking lot.

We are making these changes for the safety of you and our staff, and we appreciate your business and patience during this time.

To help limit exposure and to keep our clients and team members safe, we urge you to check out our new online store at https://www.myvetstore.ca/elizabethstreetpet for food purchases.

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call us at 403 982 8387 or email us at reception@elizabethstreetvet.com.

We are making these changes for the safety of you and our staff. We appreciate your business and patience during this time.

Thank you,

Elizabeth Street Pet Hospital